President Biden Throws Wrench Into Energy Debate in Japan 

japan
Tim Tarpley, SVP Government Affairs & Counsel

Analysis by Energy Workforce SVP Government Affairs & Counsel Tim Tarpley

At a press conference following a meeting in Japan on Monday with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, President Biden threw a large wrench into a lot of the messaging we have been hearing from the Administration on its efforts to lower energy prices and ensure energy security for Americans. 

When asked about current prices, President Biden said  “[When] it comes to the gas prices, we’re going through an incredible transition that is taking place that, God willing, when it’s over, we’ll be stronger and the world will be stronger and less reliant on fossil fuels when this is over,”

Many were taken aback by this statement, as it appears to suggest that increasing the costs of some forms of energy in the short term is part of the plan to force consumers into other energy choices. This goes counter to the official positions of the Administration and to other public statements that have been made. The statement could also give pause to our allies who are considering making long term, significant investments in LNG import infrastructure in order to receive U.S. LNG shipments.   

Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY), who was in an ENR Committee hearing about price gouging at the time of the statement, accused President Joe Biden of being “quite unconcerned about the high cost” of energy.  “He’s basically saying, ‘Take your medicine, we’re going to get you off of fossil fuels one way or the other … We have the energy in the ground in this country.”

We can expect this criticism to continue and energy prices to play an extremely important role in the midterm elections in November. 

If you would like to get involved with the Council’s advocacy efforts or the Government Affairs Committee, contact SVP Government Affairs Tim Tarpley.


Tim Tarpley, SVP Government Affairs & Counsel, analyzes federal policy for the Energy Workforce & Technology Council. Click here to subscribe to the Energy Workforce newsletter, which highlights sector-specific issues, best practices, activities and more.
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